Writing

Writing has been my passion. I like writing to the point that it is even part of my professional life. My role as a Product Manager enabled me to write succinct and elaborate business requirements, which I enjoyed doing a lot.

My foray into becoming an author started as a kid when I tried to write a mystery book heavily influenced by the bestselling series of that time, the Hardy Boys. I stopped it midway after a few pages of copy-cat story lines borrowed from the book series. I had in fact taken to poetry at age 8 or 9. It was all about ending the lines in rhyming words than it was about expressing anything serious (except for maybe a few things about nature and an old man etc.). It ended once the fascination with rhyming words ended at about age 11 or so.

I finally plunged big time into writing a book in 2013/2014 when I wanted to pen my thoughts on the Bhagavad Gita in a story form that would be relevant for the modern world. When I sat down reading the Bhagavad Gita with the intention of understanding the verses, I realized that there was a lot of deep lessons in it that are relevant even in today’s world. I also felt that whatever has been written about the Bhagavad Gita was done mostly to translate the verses in that context of the past and with God and religion taking precedence. Stripping that out and showing how the teachings of the Gita could be relevant for even a person living in today’s world was a motivation for me. I eventually self-published (after not seriously chasing any of the established publishers) my book in 2015 and got some reasonably good reviews from family and strangers. Overall, it has been a wonderful feeling to have accomplished something other than writing a useless annual review form in my job.

The links to the book can be found here:

Aham: The Other I by Nanda Kishore Rajanala https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/27772426-aham via @goodreads

I am now working on a couple of projects both in fiction and non-fiction. I abandoned working on a kid’s book after spending more than a year on it. Like sometimes in life, the path you take leads to nowhere. Walking back and taking a new direction is the wise way to go!

0Shares